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Chicago Grants Emmett Till’s South Side Home Landmark Status

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The former home of Emmett and Mamie Till at 6427 S St. Lawrence Avenue is in the West Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020. The Chicago home of Emmett Till, the Black teenager whose 1955 lynching galvanized the civil rights movement, has been granted landmark status. The Chicago City Council on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021, approved an ordinance that protects the South Side home from demolition.

CHICAGO — The Chicago home of Emmett Till, the Black teenager whose 1955 lynching galvanized the civil rights movement, has been granted landmark status.

The Chicago City Council on Wednesday approved an ordinance that protects the South Side home from demolition.

Till was 14 in the summer of 1955 when he went to visit family in Mississippi.

There he was killed by a mob of white men who accused him of whistling at a white woman.

His death became a flashpoint for the civil rights movement when his mother insisted his mutilated body be placed in an open casket so the world could see what happened.

 

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Associated Press

Associated Press

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