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Gov. Pritzker Announces ‘Restore Illinois’ Plan To Re-Open State In Five Phases

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CHICAGO – On Tuesday, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a new plan to gradually re-open the state in five phases. Under the Restore Illinois plan, each of the state’s four regions would return to non-essential business and other normal operations based on meeting certain thresholds over time.

“Restore Illinois is a public health plan to safely reintroduce the parts of our lives that have been put on hold in our fight against COVID-19,” Gov. Pritzker said in a statement. “This is also a data-driven plan that operates on a region-by-region basis, a recognition that reality on the ground looks different in different areas of our state.”

Gov. Pritzker says the state is already past Phase 1, and the modified stay-at-home order that took effect May 1st marked the start of Phase 2. In Phase 3, regions that meet certain public health thresholds could re-open non-essential manufacturing and businesses. Child care services and salons would be included in that list.

Phase 4 would allow restaurants, bars, gyms and schools to re-open with new capacity limits and guidelines. Phase 5 would be a return to normalcy, only after an approved vaccine or effective treatment becomes available.

According to illinois.gov, here are more details on the plan:

PHASE 1

  • Rapid Spread: In phase 1, the state sees a high increase in the rate of COVID-19 infection, as well as hospitalizations.
  • Stay-at-home and social distancing guidelines, along with the shutdown of all non-essential businesses, are put in place.
  • Illinois experienced Phase 1 from early March through April.

PHASE 2

  • Flattening: In Phase 2, while case numbers and hospitalizations continue to climb, they begin to flatten.
  • Hospitals are allowed to conduct some elective surgeries.
  • Non-essential retail can re-open for phone and online orders, as well as pick-up and deliveries. Some state parks can re-open, but must operate with strict social distancing and public health guidelines.
  • Individuals must wear a face mask or covering when they’re out in public and are unable to maintain a six-foot distance.
  • Phase 2 began on May 1st, when the governor’s extended stay-at-home order with modifications took effect.

PHASE 3

  • Recovery: In order to reach Phase 3, the rate of COVID-19 infection—as well as hospitalizations and filled ICU beds—needs to be in decline in that particular region.
  • The region needs to be at or below a 20% COVID-19 positivity rate, as well as a stabilized or decreased number of hospitalizations for 28 days. There also needs to be surge capacity of 14% of ICU beds and ventilators.
  •  In Phase 3, groups of 10 or fewer people can gather. Child care and summer programs can re-open under Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) guidelines.
  • Non-essential manufacturing and businesses, including barbershops, salons and retail, can re-open with capacity limits.

PHASE 4

  • Revitalization: Phase 4 allows gatherings of up to 50 people, though any major group events—like large conventions or festivals—will still be prohibited.
  • In order to reach Phase 4, a region needs to maintain a 20% or lower positivity rate over the course of 14 days. There also needs to be no increase in COVID-19 hospital admissions for 28 days, and surge capacity of 14% of ICU beds and ventilators.
  • During this phase, all employees of non-essential businesses can return to work with IDPH guidelines.
  • Bars and restaurants, as well as personal care services, cinemas and gyms, can re-open with capacity limits and IDPH guidelines.
  • Schools, higher education, summer programs and child care services can all re-open with IDPH guidelines.

PHASE 5

  • Post-pandemic: Only when a vaccine or effective treatment becomes available could the state’s regions move towards Phase 5.
  • In this phase, the state can return to normal. All sectors of the economy, as well as large gatherings, can re-open.

 

COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving story, and we are working hard to bring you the most up-to-date information. We recommend checking the Coronavirus Information Center for the most recent numbers and guidance.

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Lecia Bushak

Lecia Bushak

Lecia Bushak is a Multimedia Environmental Reporter at WILL. Previously, she was a Reporter/Producer for NPR/PBS in Cleveland, where she covered mental health, the opioid epidemic and environmental health, among a variety of other topics for radio, television and digital. Illinois Newsroom’s Environmental reporting is supported by a grant from the Backlund Charitable Trust.

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